I went on a conscious female-only-authors binge this summer and these were the best finds so far.   

 

Arlington Park, Rachel Cusk

It has been a few years for me that I have noted pseudo-feminist characters scattering across contemporary bookshelves. Perhaps, present-day writers still trying to fit women into categories. In Arlington Park such is not the case. In the Post-Girl-Boss era it is a rare gem to find stories that speak of quiet womanhood. These are simple accounts of a female community that struggle through patriarchy all the same. Here inequality is exhibited without ever stating the obvious. Enjoying by the poolside is recommended.

Pair it with: Glassy & SPF of your choosing

 

Woman’s Lore: 4,000 years of Sirens, Serpents and Succubae, Sarah Clegg

This is a great research book that does not get boring or too academic. If you are a good witch, anything that speaks of mythological creatures will most likely be of curiosity to you. My personal interest sparks when females are deemed ‘monstrous’ or get out of line, whether in fairytales or cultures so old nobody speaks the language anymore. A hand-book of male-centred societies and female sexuality appropriated through demons. Reading this one on a boat is a must.

Pair with: Rossoh & suppressed attitude

 

My Name is Lucy Barton, Elizabeth Strout

This was a sort of cheat on my TBR list as I have already familiarised myself with Strout’s exceptional writing in Olive Kitteridge. Before ringing it at the Duty Free cashier I knew it will be a perfect beach read that is not silly, yet not too complicated of a story for a sun-bed brain. The novel speaks of intricate mother-daughter relationship, unveiling the traumatising childhood of the main character. It is soft spoken, while the sentences are laid out like a beat. If mommy issues arise while reading, order a drink.

Pair with: Oh.Sole Mio & Espresso Martini

 

Reader, Fran Lebowitz

I had the honour of meeting Fran Lebowitz in Milan during her talk at the Arcimboldi theater. I am still recovering from her grand presence and my unwillingness to form an adequate sentence while speaking to the legendary writer. With that said, her documentary with Martin Scorsese Pretend It’s a City is on my watch list but I am savouring it for later. The Fran Lebowitz Reader was written in 1990s and while the short essays mirror the times; the humour, wit and contemporaneity has never aged better. Same goes for Fran.

Pair it with: Cappricio & no filter

Stay a while.

The coffee’s hot 🪑

Stay a while.

The coffee’s hot 🪑

Stay a while.

The coffee’s hot 🪑

Stay a while.

The coffee’s hot 🪑

Stay a while.

The coffee’s hot 🪑

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